Introduction

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis is rare hip condition seen in children, classically seen in obese boys. It is also is known as slipped upper femoral epiphysis.

Epidemiology

  • Incidence: 2.00 cases per 100,000 person-years
  • Peak incidence: 6-15 years
  • Sex ratio: more common in males 1.5:1
Condition Relative
incidence
Transient synovitis15.00
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis1
<1 1-5 6+ 16+ 30+ 40+ 50+ 60+ 70+ 80+

Aetiology

Basics
  • typically age group is 10-15 years
  • More common in obese children and boys
  • Displacement of the femoral head epiphysis postero-inferiorly
  • May present acutely following trauma or more commonly with chronic, persistent symptoms

Clinical features

Features
  • hip, groin, medial thigh or knee pain
  • loss of internal rotation of the leg in flexion
  • bilateral slip in 20% of cases

Investigations

Investigation
  • AP and lateral (typically frog-leg) views are diagnostic

Management

Management
  • internal fixation: typically a single cannulated screw placed in the center of the epiphysis