Introduction

Acute bacterial prostatitis is typically caused by gram-negative bacteria entering the prostate gland via the urethra.

Epidemiology

  • Incidence: 30.00 cases per 100,000 person-years
  • Peak incidence: 30-40 years
<1 1-5 6+ 16+ 30+ 40+ 50+ 60+ 70+ 80+

Aetiology

Risk factors for acute bacterial prostatitis include recent urinary tract infection, urogenital instrumentation, intermittent bladder catheterisation and recent prostate biopsy.

Pathophysiology

Escherichia coli is the most commonly isolated pathogen.

Clinical features

Features
  • the pain of prostatitis may be referred to a variety of areas including the perineum, penis, rectum or back
  • obstructive voiding symptoms may be present
  • fever and rigors may be present
  • digital rectal examination: tender, boggy prostate gland

Management

Management
  • Clinical Knowledge Summaries currently recommend a 14-day course of a quinolone
  • consider screening for sexually transmitted infections